Monday, February 09, 2009

Low Carb Diabetic Diets

Diabetic Diets

hanks to Jennifer Aniston, Dr. Atkins’ low-carb diet is the latest craze among weight watchers. However, the furor it has caused in the medical circles is also due to the fact that it is steeped with immense benefits for diabetics. In fact, it is fast gaining precedence over the traditional low-calorie, low-fat diet once prescribed for diabetics—a diet that has now been conclusively proven to be detrimental to the diabetic patient’s health.

This all-out attack on carbohydrates is understandable, as diabetes is a condition where sugar and starch are not properly absorbed from the bloodstream. And when the body is incapacitated in this way, an excess of carbohydrates can be harmful.

Anything more than 5%-10% carbohydrates in your daily caloric intake is a taboo in all the low-carb diets. These place emphasis on consumption of protein and fats so that the body is full and doesn’t experience hunger pangs. For it is only when the body feels that it is starving, that one tends to gorge on sugary foods. The feeling of fullness can be achieved with bulky fiber-rich food, too. In fact, low carb diets are unique in that you can have anything you desire, as long as it is not rich in carbohydrates. However, they all do fall short of recommending overstuffing oneself.

In low-carb diets, the foods that are approved are meats, fish, poultry, eggs and cheese and certain vegetables like kidney beans, carrots, avocados. It is worth remembering that since carbohydrates are almost barred from the diet chart, low-carb diets profess a moderately high fat intake to obtain the necessary energy. As a result, obese diabetic patients do need to consult a physician and adopt a modified version of the diet.

Low-carb diets are here to stay. Considering that carbohydrates are the bane of diabetes, it is definitely the most sensible diet plan for this particular group of individuals.

By: Eddie Tobey

Diabetic Diets - What to Eat and What to Avoid

Diabetic Diets

When a person has diabetes, their body does not produce enough insulin to manage the blood sugar levels within the body. This means that a person will have to resort to other measures for controlling their blood sugar levels by following a diabetic diet accompanied with regular exercise.

Other ways to ease the complications of diabetes is to take medication, such as daily injections of insulin or taking a pill, such as glucophage.

The people who are most likely to become diabetic are individuals who are overweight, as well as inactive.

In addition, many develop diabetes because people in their family are susceptible to it due to heredity. It is also the lifestyle of a person that contributes to this occurrence.

Avoiding exercise, eating lots of fats and sugar within your diet, as well as being overweight or obese, are some of the factors surrounding diabetes. It can occur at anytime with signs including frequent urination and excessive thirst.

When someone is diabetic, they are unable to produce or correctly use insulin throughout their body, which is the hormone that is responsible for changing sugar, starches and other food into energy.

One of the ways to follow a diabetic diet is to eat foods from all of the four basic food groups, as well as decrease the consumption of alcohol, fat, and sweets.

You can incorporate a wide variety of nutritious foods into a diabetic diet.

A diabetic’s diet must follow this lifestyle change wherever they may be.

When eating out at a restaurant, there are a few tips to follow when deciphering the types of food items and meals you should look out for or avoid.

When choosing something that will adhere to your diabetic diet, you should avoid foods that are described as being “creamed,” “fried” or “sautéed.” These foods are most likely to contain loads of fat.

Foods that contain a lot of cheese, butter, oil or mayonnaises should be avoided on diabetic diets. If you must taste these foods during your meal, you should order them to arrive as a side item.

Other foods that can stray from diabetic diets include those that are prepared with sweet and sour sauce, as well as teriyaki and barbeque. They contain high amounts of sugar and carbohydrates that should be avoided while on a diabetic diet.

Diabetic diets should count the number of calories from fat as being 30% less than the total number of calories eaten throughout one day.

Diabetic diets should include foods that are low in saturated fats and cholesterol, such as skinless poultry, fresh fruit, and vegetables.

When on a diabetic diet, you should stay away from red meats, eggs, as well as whole-milk dairy products.

Diabetic diets work better when the dairy in your life comes from low-fat or fat-free selections.

10-20% of your daily calories on a diabetic diet should come from proteins in foods, such as lean meat, fish, and low-fat dairy products. The rest of a diabetic diet should consist of carbohydrates coming from whole grains, beans, as well as fresh vegetables and fruit.

Overall, there is no official diabetic diet to follow and it really depends on the individual diabetic.

If you are able to work closely with a dietician, doctor, or nutritionist, you will be able to find a balance within your diabetic diet and exercise routine.

By: Stephen Todd